Wednesday, October 22, 2014

No Spray Fruit

I get asked quite a bit during peach season if they are "no spray" peaches.

No spray.

What does no spray look like?

Well, rest easy knowing that unless you have a peach, apple, pear, etc. tree in your back yard that you most likely haven't seen or consumed true "no spray" fruit (there is a very short list that can be an acceptation to this but let's stick with apples, pears, and peaches for this post). Even the organic guys are spraying something. Most likely copper to control disease and then what ever approved insecticides they can to help control loss. Or they might be using a clay to coat the fruit to help save them.

The reality is in a commercial setting there is a lot of money on the line.

But beyond that my question to you is:

Is what we want...really what we want?

Well by today's standards, I'm going to say "No!"

How do I know this...well, for example, week after week I have watched every single heirloom tomato get handled and turned over because we are looking for the "best" one...the most perfect, un-cracked, unmarked heirloom tomato.

"No spray" and aesthetic perfection as far as orchard fruit goes...don't really go hand in hand.  

To demonstrate, please feast your eyes on this photographic display of no spray apples (courtesy of my Mom's back yard) and low spray pick-your-own apples....

no spray apples vs. low spray apples

left: low spray and right: no spray

low spray apples

no spray apples
Now just to be fair to the "no spray" apples I ate one...I didn't eat the skin but I cut it open, sliced it and took a bite....

It was delish!  We have no idea what variety they are but they are very good. So just goes to show you can't judge a "book by it's cover."

But my question to you is...if we had the no spray apples and the low spray apples sitting next to each other on our table at the farmers' market, which one would you buy?

6 comments:

  1. Well done Rose. I am so proud of how you are presenting these touchy, important topics. Your use of pictures is spot on, no pun intended, and a perfect tool to express your point. Freakin well done rose. This needs to be printed in local newspapers and magazines. I appreciate your perspective so much. I get your frustration. There's a lot of people out there that want to do and eat the right thing, but just don't understand all the facts. This is great. Thanks, please keep posting.

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    1. Thank you very much! I was very lucky that my Mom has an apple tree in her back yard!

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  2. No spray! In countries like Japan, people pay more for the fruits that have insect markings on them because they know that those fruits where what the bugs wanted to eat so they were better. Organic should mean organic, no compromising. That's what I want to put in my body. Americans are going to have to evolve with how things look as they get more in touch with their food and where it comes from. And when they learn that no spray fruits are the most delicious.

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    1. Jill, Thanks so much for your comment. I agree that as people are more tuned in to where and how their food is grown they will be more open to how things look when they are completely natural.

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  3. i just wanna thank you for sharing your this info on your blog
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    1. Hi Leo, It's one of my personal and professional goals to really focus on education and how food is produced. Thanks so much for reading!

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